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Notes for Marmaduke Coate and Edith Gilling

Marmaduke Coate was a prominent and active member of the Kingsbury Meeting Society of Friends in Somersetshire, England. [1]

Research Notes:

The records below suggest that there may have been more than one Marmaduke Coate married to Edith. The baptisms of children of Marmaduke and Edith Coate may involve more than one family. We seek further evidence and clarification about the Coate families of Curry Rivel and the surrounding area.

1643 Elizabeth Coate, daughter of Marmaduke and Edith Coate was baptized on November 22 at Curry Rivel. [2]

1652 Marmaduke Coate, the son of Marmaduke and Edith Coate, was born in Hambridge, Somerset, England. [3] [4] [5]

1653 Marmaduke Coate, of Curry Rivel, leased land. "Close of meadow called Honilands (4a.). The premises were leased (lives) by Francis Crane of Somerton to Marmaduke Coate of Curry Rivel, et al., in 1653 and were subsequently held (99 yrs and lives) by Wm. Coate, sen., Dan. Cox, and Jn. Mew (tenant of Francis Crane of Bridgwater and Wm. Knight of Cannington), all of Curry Rivel. In 1738 they were assigned to Thos. Alford II in trust for Sam. Powell IV. Mortgage pf 1732 refers also to a mess. built by Jn. Coat on E. side of a street called Willtowne, Curry Rivel." [6]

1659 Thomas Coate, the son of Marmaduke Coate, was borne the eleventh day of ffebruary 1659. [7]

1661 Joan Coate, the daughter of Marmaduke Coate, was borne the twelfth day of ffebruary 1661. [8]

1663 Marmaduke Coate, son of Marmaduke Coate, was baptized October 6, 1663. [9]

1664 Elizabeth Coate, the daughter of Marmaduke Coate, was baptized January 7, 1663/64. [10]

1667-71 The births, to Marmaduke and Edith Coate, of children Hannah (12-6-1667, buried 1684), Anna (30-8-1669), and William (6-7-1671) were recorded at the Kingsbury monthly meeting records, South Somerset, England [11] [12].

1668 Marmaduke Coate of Curry-Rivel, Somersetshire, was imprisoned at the suit of Samuel Mann, vicar of that place, for with holding tithes. [13]

1670 A justice of the peace came to a [Quaker] meeting at the house of Henry Lavour and took the Friends to the inn, where they were fined. Goods worth £20 were taken from Marmaduke Coate of Hambridge to pay part of the fine of Jane Whitehead. Dated June 7. [14] [15] [16]

1670 "Marmaduke Coate of Hambridge, imprisoned in the 6th moneth 1670 upon an Attachment out of the Exchequer, upon Contempt, as charged, to the Suit of Robert Bambury Impropriator, for not paying Tythes." [17]

1671 Marmaduke Coate was present "Att the quarterly meeting of friends att Ilchester 23 of first Mo 1670/71" [March 1671]. His name had not appeared on prior lists. [18]

1672 Marmaduke Coate was present at the quarterly meeting at Invelchester 20 of fourth Mo [June] 1672". [19]

1672 Marmaduke Coate and John Coate were present at the quarterly meeting at Ilchester 26 of 7th Mo [September] 1672". [20]

1672 Marmaduke Coate was present at the quarterly meeting at Ivelchester 19 of 10th Mo [December] 1672". [21]

1672-73 John Coate and Marmaduke Coate were listed as prisoners in the gaol of Ilchester. John Coate and several others (but not Marmaduke Coate), had the word "Exported" before their names. The citation notes that "Exported" indicates that they would have been transported to the east coast of North America. [22]

1673 Marmaduke Coate was present at the quarterly meeting at Ivelchester the 18th day of the 10th Moneth [December] 1673". [23]

1673 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 18th of 10th mo: [December], 1673. [24]

1674 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 19th of first mo: [March], 1673/74. [25]

1674 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 24th of 7th mo: [September], 1674. [26]

1675 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 17th of 4th mo: [June], 1675. [27]

1676 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 23th of first mo: [March], 1675/76. [28]

1676 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 22th of 4th mo: [June], 1676. [29]

1676 John and Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 28th of 7th mo: [September], 1676. [30]

1676 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 21th of 10th mo: [December], 1676. [31]

1676 "Marmaduke Coate of Haucbridge, imprisoned in the 6th moneth 1670 upon an Attachment out of the Exchequer, upon Contempt, as charged, to the Suit of Robert Bambury Impro‚ą£priator, for not paying Tythes." [32]

1677 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 20th of 10th mo: [December], 1677. [33]

1678 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 21th of first mo: [March], 1677/78. [34]

1678 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 26th of 7th mo: [September], 1678. [35]

1678 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 19th of 10th mo: [December], 1678. [36]

1678 An account was made of Friends imprisoned at Ilchester and included Marmaduke Coate of Hambridge who had been imprisoned in August 1670 at the suit of Robert Banbury, Impropriator. [37] [38]

1679 John and Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 18th of 10th mo: [December], 1679. [39]

1680 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 18th of first mo: [March], 1679/80. [40]

1680 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 17th of 4th mo: [June], 1680. [41]

1680 John and Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 23th of 10th mo: [December], 1680. [42]

1681 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 24th of first mo: [March], 1680/81. [43]

1681 Marmaduke Coate and Hugh Playse attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ilchester, Somerset, England on 23th of 4th mo: [June], 1681. [44]

1681 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Ivelchester, Somerset, England on 22d of 10th mo: [December], 1681. [45]

1682 (Brothers) John and Marmaduke Coate were in prison in March of 1682 when he was a signer of a petition to seek some relief from the conditions in which they lived while recognizing King Charles the Second to be chief Magistrate of the Kingdom ... and resolve to be subject to him. There were 9 signers in all. [46] [47]

1682 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Taunton, Somerset, England on 23 of first mo: [March], 1681/82. [48]

1682 Marmaduke Coate attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Streate, Somerset, England on 27d of 10th mo: [December], 1682. [49]

1683 Marmaduke Coate and Hugh Playse attended the quarterly Quaker meeting at Streat, Somerset, England on 27th of 7th moneth [September], 1683. [50]

1683 On 12 November, "For as much as it appears unto me, that the Persons under-named were present at an unlawful Meeting ... in the Dwelling house of a Person unknown, in Gregory-Stoke in the said County" [Someset], on Sunday the 11 of last November and they were conveyed to the prison at Ilchester by authority of Henry Walrond. The list of names included Marmaduke Coate, the younger, of Hambridge. [51] [52]

1683 "On 15 November, seventeen Persons were sent by Captain Walrond to Prison, from a Meeting at Ilminster, namely, Robert French, John Lombard, John Long, Walter Giles, William Stacey, John Rich, Daniel How, Giles Knight, William Watts, Sarah Osborne, Anne Collier, Susanna Garland, Elizabeth Ford, Anne Limbry, Elizabeth Limbry, Mary Sprake, and Edith Coate." [53] [54]

1683/4 On 22 of month 11 [February], Marmaduke Coate was among eight Friends who were sentenced to prison by judge Edward Phillips of the court of Ilchester. Most Quakers who had been arrested were released, "for there was a sad cry in the country before, about sending so many friends to prison, who kept so many at work, that the poor were like to be starved for lack of it. We are now about sixty belonging to the prison yet, old and young." [55] [56]

1683/84 On 26 of month 12 [February], Marmaduke Coat, of Hambridge, brought to prison again, this being the third time of Marmaduke Coat's imprisonment, while I [John Whiting] was a prisoner. [57] [58]

"Marmaduke Coate, Sen. of Hambridge, an honest, faithful, and upright, but suffering, man, being mostly a prisoner for tithes &c. and his goods often spoiled by Henry Walrond, for meeting. And being now a prisoner, (but having a little liberty to be at home) was committed again (to make sure of him) by the said Henry Walrond, on sessions process, for not coming to church, so called, though he was a prisoner before. ... [Henry Walrond later] confessed to Marmaduke Coat abovesaid, and promised he would never do so again [persecute Qualkers]; but afterwards fell to it with more violence than before; and was very malicious and troublesome to the said Marmaduke and his family in particular, by imprisonment and spoil of goods, he being a man of substance, and living near him, and kept the gang of Brooms [Walrond's deputies] aforesaid about him, who helped to devour his estate as they had done others..." [59]

1684 Hannah Coate, daughter of Marmaduke and Edith Coate, died on 4 of month 3 (May), in Somersetshire, England. [60]

1684 Several Quaker prisoners presented a petition to the Court of Assizes [in Somerset]. Marmaduke Coate, arrested for not paying tithes, was a signor. Dated August 5. [61]

1684 In Somerset: "It happened this Summer that a Daughter of Marmaduke Coate, a reputable Yeoman, but one called a Quaker, died, and many of the Neighbours came to her Funeral. Information of this Burial was given to Justice Walrond, and he sent his Warrant for several, and examined them upon their Oaths, who were at the said Burial ? thus making them inform against one another. Whereupon he imposed Fines on several of the Neighbours". [62]

1687 Marmaduke Coate was present at the Ilchester monthly meeting on 27 of 11m 1686/87 (February 27). [63]

1687 Marmaduke Coate was present at the Ilchester monthly meeting on 24 of 12m 1686/87 (March 24). [64]

1687 Marmaduke Coate of Hambridge died on 11 of month 4 (June), in Somersetshire, England [65]. In all, Marmaduke Coate had been imprisoned for 15 years and 5 months [66].

1687 Marmaduke Coate's will was proved in 1687. However, registers of the Somerset Quaker Meeting show his death as April 11, 1689. He made bequests to sons Marmaduke and William; daughters Edith, Jane, Elizabeth, and Ann; and widow Edith, the execturice. [67] An abstract by Parks reports [68]:

Will of Marmaduke Coate of Curry Rivel, dated 1st day of September 1685. He gave legacies to his sons Marmaduke Coate and William and to his daughters, Edith, Mary, Jane, Elizabeth, and Ann. The rest of his goods and chattels he gave to his wife Edith, who he made sole Executrix of his will. (One daughter named Hanna died in his lifetime). Will proven Taunton 1687.

1689 "On the 17th of the Month called August, Edith Coate, of Hambridge, and Marmaduke Coate her Son, were committed to Prison on an Exchequer Process for small Tithes, at the Suit of James Strong, Priest of Curry-Revel." [69]

1702 Marmaduke Coate of Hambridge was prosecuted in the Exchequer for Tithes, at the Suit of Robert Banbury Impropriator. [70] [71]

1718 Edith Coate of Hambridge, died on the 24th of month 10. [72] [73]

A biosketch, from a genealogy of the Comly family, reports [74]:

The Coate Family of Somersetshire, Eng., and Burlington, N. J.
(i) Marmaduke Coate and his wife Edith were living in Hambridge, Somersetshire, Eng., in 1650. Marmaduke died 4-11-1689 and Edith, his wife, on 10-24-1718.

The vital statistics of the families of both Marmaduke and his son Marmaduke are found in the Bristol and Somerset, Eng., Friends' Meeting records of Kingsbury Meeting.

"Marmaduke Coate, son of Marmaduke and Edith, of Hambridge, Somersetshire, Eng., was born 1652. His parents became Quakers and suffered accordingly. … The sufferings of his father, as respects bodily confinement, at least were unusual even for that day. He paid a £20 fine in Fourth month, 1670, for attending a meeting and in Eighth month, 1670, was jailed at Ilchester … for refusing to pay tithes and was found there in 1678 by John Witing who was committed to that place. Henry Walrond, a great persecutor in County Somerset, was particularly severe on Marmaduke because he had money. He was still a prisoner in 1682 and he, John Coate (probably a brother) and Joseph Lye wrote a protest to Judges of Assize. … (He was released in 1686, a total of 15 years.)

"Marmaduke, the younger, on 9-11-1684, was taken at a meeting at Gregory Stokes by Walrond and jailed with his father. On the 26th of the same month, Edith Coate, a daughter of Marmaduke the elder, was arrested for attending a meeting at Ilchester, and put in jail by Walrond. … She apparently died in prison and Walrond fined many who went to her funeral." [From "The Friend", Vol. XXIX, p. 276, the letter of protest being given in full on p. 285 of Vol. XXIX.] (But "Edith Coat, daughter of Marmaduke and Edith, married 8-6-1686, Hugh Plaice.")

Marmaduke and Edith Coate had issue:

(2)Marmaduke, Jr., b. 1652, m. Ann Pole.
(3)Hannah, b. 6-12-1667, d. 1684.
(4) Jane, m. 5-24-1686, James Clothier.
(5) Edith, m. 8-6-1686, Hugh Plaice.
(6) Elizabeth, m. 5-12-1693, Joseph Masters.
(7) Ann, b. 8-30-1669, m. 5-18-1698, Wm. Masters.
(8) William, b. 7-6-1671.

Research Notes:

The research of Ernest Parks lists 8 children born 1657-71. This source may skip a generation at this point. Marmaduke Coate was born in Hambridge. He was named in his grandmother's will dated 1626. [75]

A biosketch of son Marmaduke Coate Jr starts with an account of the imprisonment of Marmaduke Coate Sr [76] [77]:

Marmaduke Coate, the son of Marmaduke and Edith Coate, of Hambridge, in the county of Somerset, England, was born in the year 1652. Whilst yet young, his parents were convinced of the Truth as held by the people called Quakers, and he was evidently brought up "in the nurture and admonition of the Lord." His parents suffered much in support of the doctrines of the Lord Jesus Christ, being fined and imprisoned. The suffering of his father, at least as respects bodily confinement, was unusual, even in that day. For tithes his imprisonments were long, and the spoiling of his goods not small, but through all he continued faithful, bearing an honest testimony by his waiting in truth, and cheerfully suffering for it, and leaving a seed behind him, to bear similar sufferings in the same blessed cause.

In the Fourth month, 1670, Thomas Whitehead and Jane his wife, being at Yeovil, held a meeting at the house of Henry Lavor, in that place. A magistrate named Helliar, with his officers and some soldiers, came where Friends were assembled, and although it appears that nothing had been said, yet he turned the Friends out of the house, and conducted them prisoners to a neighbouring inn. As they passed along the street, Thomas Whitehead exhorted those about them " to repent and fear God." His wife also made some similar remarks. For this they were each fined £20, and the money was collected off the Friends, who had assembled at the meetiug. Marmaduke Coate, the elder, was there, and being a man of substance, his portion of the fine was £20.

In the Eighth month, the same year, Marmaduke was sued for tithes, for which, as he could not conscientiously pay the demand, he was cast into prison at Ilchester, where he was found, in the Fourth month, 1678, by John Whiting, who was committed to that place. Henry Walrond, whom John Whiting characterises as the greatest persecutor in the county of Somerset, was particularly severe on Marmaduke Coate, because being a man of property, he could the more easily make unrighteous gain off of him than his poorer neighbours. During Marmaduke's long imprisonment for tithes, on one occasion having a little temporary liberty allowed him, perhaps by the jailer, to go and look after his affairs at home, Walrond committed him again, although already a prisoner in the eye of the law. Many were the distraints he made on the goods of this innocent prisoner, until on one occasion meeting with a check, he confessed to Marmaduke that nothing prospered with him, and promised that he would persecute no more. This fit of repentance was soon over, and afterwards he was even more bitter than before, particularly towards Marmaduke. He had been a man of property, with a fair estate, and a fine noble person. But when he put his hands to the work of enriching himself, by spoiling his honest neighbours, everything went against, him. He became so poor at last, that no one would trust him for a sixpenny loaf, and he had to spin to make a pitiful subsistence before he died. Whiting quotes concerning him, an old saying, "Such a thrifty trade is persecution, that it leaves men never a friend in heaven or on earth." After stating that Walrond "died miserably poor, as well as miserable otherwise," he gives a saying of Walter Raleigh,—" These are the men that sought the misery of others, and misery found them out."

In the year 1082, being still in prison, Marmaduke Coate, John Coate, probably an elder brother, and a number of others prepared the following address:

To the Judges of Assize, in the County of Somerset.

The representation of the people of God, called Quakers, in humility,

Sheweth,

That we profess faith in one only God, through our Lord Jesus Christ, whom we worship in his Spirit, according to the Holy Scriptures, and in the leadings of the same, are taught to love God above all, and our neighbours as ourselves, and to lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty; and do own Charles the Second to be chief magistrate of this kingdom, and other his dominions, as being eminently preserved and brought into the government thereof, by the immediate hand of God : and do still resolve to be subject to him, and those in authority under him for conscience' sake, as good Protestant subjects, truly desiring to answer the just end of government, which is for the subduing of sin and vice, and encouragement of righteousness and virtue.

Yet notwithstanding we have been, and many us are still exposed to such perils and sufferings as must inevitably bring many peaceable and industrious families, who desire the good of the king and kingdom, to utter ruin and destruction, and that only for their pure conscience toward God, (before whom we must all appear, and give an account, and receive a reward according to the deeds done in the body,) and that by laws made against papists, or meetings to plot and contrive insurrections, under pretence of religious worship, and seditious conventicles, which principles and practices we utterly deny and detest, as our peaceable deportment under many great sufferings, by those formerly in power, and since also, may sufficiently manifest. Some few particulars of our late sufferings annexed, are presented to your consideration, for this end, that as Providence orders your coming this circuit to do justice, you may not be altogether unacquainted with our sufferings, but may use your authority to relieve the oppressed, and put a stop to the cruel proceedings of our oppressors; at least discountenance such unmerciful practices. That so ye may appear to be such as are a terror to evil-doers, and a praise to them that do well, which is truly acceptable to the Lord. Therein his peace and blessing will be with you, which is the earnest desire and prayer of the innocent suffering people aforesaid.

John Coate, Joseph Lye, Marmaduke Coate

Marmaduke Coate, the younger, the subject of this memoir, on the 11th of the Ninth month, 1684, was taken at a meeting at Gregory Stoke, by Walrond, and sent to Ilchester prison, where his father still was. On the twenty-sixth of the same month, Edith Coate, a daughter of Marmaduke, the elder, being with others at a meeting in Ilminster, to worship God in spirit and in truth, as they had for many years regularly done, Henry Walrond came with his troop, arrested a number of whom Edith was one, and the next day committed them to prison.

At the Sessions, in the Eleventh month, eighty-three of the Friends, in the Somerset prison, were liberated by court, and in the following month, thirty-two more were released by the jailer. Among these last appears to have been Marmaduke Coate, the elder. He was, however, through the instrumentality of his persecutors, in again for tithes before the month had expired. Whilst a prisoner for tithes, he was indicted for absence from the parish place of worship, and fined for a breach of law, which he could not have prevented.

In the Sessions held in the Fifth month, 1684, at Bridgewater, in Somerset, the prisoners again addressed the justices, who discharged several of those then recently committed. Again, in the Sixth month, they addressed the justices appointed to hold the assizes at Wells. Still Marmaduke was kept a prisoner. In this summer his beloved daughter Edith was taken sick and deceased. We know not whether the privilege was granted him to take a last farewell of her or not, but we know that he who pitieth those that fear him, is a God of comfort, and able to consider his faithful children under every trial that can come upon them. Walrond fined many of the neighbours, who attended her burial.

King Charles the Second dying, his brother James came to the throne, and being inclined to favour the Catholics, he was willing to favour all who, for dissent from the Church of England, were in prison. He put forth a proclamation for a general pardon on the 10th of the First month, 1686, and as the executive part thereof was committed to the justices, Friends in the Somerset prisons prepared a statement and address to be laid before the the Quarter Sessions held at Wells, on the 30th of the same month.

Lindsey Brien wrote a story about Marmaduke Coate and his descendents through his son Marmaduke (Junior). The story is on record in the Garth Museum in Greenville Ohio (See newspaper scan).

Marmaduke, who married Edith, was from Hambridge, Somerset, England. While his son Marmaduke was young, he and Edith became "convinced on the truth" and raised their children as Quakers. Marmaduke was an honest, faithful Quaker who suffered over fifteen years in prison for his faith and lost most of his property by fines imposed for his religious beliefs. He was a prisoner at the time of the proclamation of general pardon by King James, when Friends were released by hundreds.

1651 Marmaduke Coate and Ann Lock, both of Curry Rivel, were married on June 24, at Pitney parish, Somerset. [78]

Edith Gilling reportedly married a Saterthwaite and a Fell before marrying Marmaduke Coate.

The last name of wife Edith has also been variously reported as Fell/ Satterthwaite/ Maxwellton.

1655 Marmaduke Coate and Joan Woodborne, daughter of John Woodborne, were married on June 25, at Currey Rivel, Somersetshire, England. Witnessed by Marmaduke Podger and Henry Norris. [79]


Footnotes:

[1] George Norwood Comly, Comly family in America, descendants of Henry and Joan Comly (1939), 797, [HathiTrust].

[2] Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1628-1720; Reference Number: D\P\cur.r/2/1/1, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[3] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 29 (1856), No 35, 276, extensive biosketch, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[4] Arthur Lee Humphreys, The Somerset Roll, an experimental list of worthies (London: 1897), 24, [GoogleBooks].

[5] Arthur Lee Humphries, Somersetshire parishes, a handbook of historical reference to all places in the county, Vol. 1 (London, 1906), 266, [HathiTrust].

[6] The National Archives of the United Kingdom Catalog, Somerset Heritage Centre (South West Heritage Trust) DD\AL/9, [UKNationalArchives].

[7] Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1628-1720; Reference Number: D\P\cur.r/2/1/1, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[8] Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1628-1720; Reference Number: D\P\cur.r/2/1/1, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[9] Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1628-1720; Reference Number: D\P\cur.r/2/1/1, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[10] Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1628-1720; Reference Number: D\P\cur.r/2/1/1, [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[11] England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837, Piece RG6/1439: Monthly Meeting of South Somerset (to 1783), and Mid-Somerset (1657-1748), [AncestryRecord], [AncestryImage].

[12] The National Archives of the United Kingdom Catalog, Bristol and Somerset: Monthly Meeting of South Somerset, [UKNationalArchives].

[13] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 599, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[14] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 600, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[15] John Whiting, Persecution Exposed, in some Memoirs Relating to the Sufferings of John Whiting, Second edition (London: James Phillips, 1791), 37, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[16] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 29 (1856), No 35, 276, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[17] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 612, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[18] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 91, [HathiTrust].

[19] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 96, [HathiTrust].

[20] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 97, [HathiTrust].

[21] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 99, [HathiTrust].

[22] J. Stevens Cox, "Ilchester Gaol and House of Correction," Ilchester Historical Monographs, Number 4, (Ivel House, Ilchester: 1949), 95.

[23] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 103, [HathiTrust].

[24] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 103, [HathiTrust].

[25] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 104, [HathiTrust].

[26] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 106, [HathiTrust].

[27] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 108, [HathiTrust].

[28] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 111, [HathiTrust].

[29] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 112, [HathiTrust].

[30] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 113, [HathiTrust].

[31] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 114, [HathiTrust].

[32] William Penn, The continued cry of the oppressed for justice, in two parts (1676), 37, [Early English Books text search], [GoogleBooks pages 1-34], [EarlyEnglishBooksOnlineInstitutionalLogin].

[33] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 119, [HathiTrust].

[34] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 120, [HathiTrust].

[35] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 123, [HathiTrust].

[36] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 124, [HathiTrust].

[37] Joseph Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People Called Quakers, Vol. 1 (1753), 612, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

[38] The Friend, A Religious and Literary Journal 29 (1856), No 35, 276, [GoogleBooks], [HathiTrust].

[39] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 132, [HathiTrust].

[40] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 134, [HathiTrust].

[41] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 135, [HathiTrust].

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[44] Stephen C. Morland, ed., "The Somersetshire Quarterly Meeting of the Society of Friends 1668-1699," Somerset Record Society 75 (1978), 139, [HathiTrust].

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[52] John Whiting, Persecution Exposed, in some Memoirs Relating to the Sufferings of John Whiting, Second edition (London: James Phillips, 1791), 204, of 203-4, [InternetArchive], [HathiTrust].

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